ABOUT UGANDA

Uganda sits on the equator where the day is exactly 12 hours long, with sunrise at around 6.30 am and sunset at 6.30 pm.

 

There are two different dry seasons in Uganda which are between December and February and between June and August. The average temperature is around 25 degrees centigrade and the average rainfall is between 500mm to 2500mm per year. These seasons are perfect for producing fruits like mango's, bananas, guavas, pineapples, watermelons, jack fruits, avocados and much more.

 

And if you are presented with a pan of fried grasshoppers you should consider yourself a special guest because it is one of their favorite treats.

Uganda has 2 main cities which are Kampala and Entebbe. When flying into Entebbe the district of Mityana is just one hour and a half away where our charity is based.

Ugandans speak over 30 different African languages. English and Swahili are the country’s official languages.

For anyone visiting this beautiful country you will receive a very warm welcome. The native people of Uganda love to have visitors from around the world and are so interested in showing you their culture and their way of life.

You will be drawn in by Uganda's stunning landscape - green rolling hills, snow capped mountains, rain forests, majestic rivers and massive lakes. There are also a number of outstanding national parks for safari and you can encounter the wildlife for which Africa is renowned. Uganda's beauty, wildlife diversity, and friendly people justify its reputation as "The Pearl of Africa". 

English became the official language after independence and is taught in schools, used in courts of law, and used by most newspapers

UGANDAN PEOPLE

Many westerners can be apprehensive about visiting Uganda. However the local people are so friendly and love to have visitors to their country. It is a very safe place to walk around both during the day and at night in both rural and urban areas​

Africans are very community oriented.  They take care of each other, watch each other's children, and are extremely family-oriented.  The African family not only consists of one's immediate family, but also their extended family.As well, most East African people groups are male-dominated.  Women and children often do not eat with the men.  Men are served first and are the dominant figure in the family.

People here travel around by using taxis or bodas which are motorbike taxis and are a lifeline for people in these communities in order to travel to hospitals and appointments.

LIFE IN BIG CITIES

Kampala is an amazing city and it never sleeps. There is so much to see and so much to do. There are lots of markets for clothes, food, local produce and souvenirs. Here you will find taxi parks and bus parks in order to travel the country. You can also take a bus to neighboring Kenya for a few days or use the taxis to travel anywhere you like throughout Uganda. 

When in Kampala like any major city walking at night is still safe however this is at your own risk and you must be alert and keep your possessions safe.

VILLAGE LIFE

Many westerners can be apprehensive about visiting Uganda. However the local people are so friendly and love to have visitors to their country. It is a very safe place to walk around both during the day and at night in both rural and urban areas​

Africans are very community oriented.  They take care of each other, watch each other's children, and are extremely family-oriented.  The African family not only consists of one's immediate family, but also their extended family.As well, most East African people groups are male-dominated.  Women and children often do not eat with the men.  Men are served first and are the dominant figure in the family.

People here travel around by using taxis or bodas which are motorbike taxis and are a lifeline for people in these communities in order to travel to hospitals and appointments.

LIFE IN BIG CITIES

FACTS ABOUT UGANDAN SCHOOLING

- The UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (Unesco) has estimated that 68% of children in Uganda who enroll in primary school are likely to drop out before finishing the prescribed seven years mainly due to lack of money.

- A 2012 study found that in primary seven, the final class in the primary cycle, 2 out of every 10 pupils could not read a primary two-level story.

 

- Only 12% of the teaching population are womem

- In Uganda, a child who quits attending school is three times more likely to be HIV positive later on in life than a child who completes basic education.

- Girls only stay in school an average of 9 years

UGANDAN SCHOOLS & SCHOOL FEE

The World Bank reported that teacher absenteeism, whatever the cause, meant that 40% of public school classrooms did not have a teacher teaching in them.

During our visits to multiple schools the problems are clear. We have witnessed no teachers present, under qualified teachers, lack of scholastic materials, lack of food and water for the children, no toilets and poor structures made from wood and mud. 

It is for these reasons we need your support to create change for these children and give them a reliable and productive level of education.   

School fees are an enormous uphill battle in Uganda. In a country where the average parent earns less than $1 per day saving enough money to put their children through school is a huge problem. School fees have huge variables however they can range from £10 to £100 per 3 month term. 

We want to find sponsors to help these families to be able to send their children to school and give them hope for a better future. Through our program and through our school we can offer them stability, qualified teachers, safety and a more productive environment to give them the skills  they need to lead a more positive and productive life.

FOOD

Due to the rainy and dry seasons the climate is perfect for producing masses of vegetables and fruits. Most families will have a piece of land where they will grow things like, sweet potatoes, cabbage, maize, cassava, coffee, bananas, mango's, guavas etc. This is all used to feed their family and generate a little extra income. Simple meals are often cooked at home using outdoor kitchens.

 

The street food which you find all along the roadside is excellent and perfectly safe. They are famous for making what they call a 'rolex'. This is an omelette with fresh onion and tomato wrapped in a chapatti. You can also find grilled chicken, sausages, samosas, chaps, chips, corn, grilled bananas and more.